theclotheshorse:

Nasiba photographed by TheUrbanSpotter

theclotheshorse:

Nasiba photographed by TheUrbanSpotter

knitmecrazy:

I had a little frizzy headed model for this one :p

I’m actually still hoping that it will fit it’s owner because I started decreasing too soon. We’ll see, though.

Source: knitmecrazy

To an extent it’s a problem with fandom: the fact is that you’ve got thousands of intelligent people thinking about a problem, and statistically speaking some of them are likely to come up with something more clever than the creators. […] There comes a point at which, frankly, fandom IS better than the creators. We have more minds, more cumulative talent, more voices arguing for different kinds of representation, more backstory… The thing is that I rarely get involved with a show without a fandom anymore, because I actually enjoy the analysis and fic and fun more than I enjoy the show itself. Similarly, I get drawn into shows I otherwise wouldn’t really consider by the strength of their fandom. And I want the shows to live up to their fandom, but it’s an almost impossibly high bar, because the parts of fandom I choose to engage with are often parts that wouldn’t be considered sufficiently accessible or relevant to a majority of viewers. So… basically, for me, fandom is primary, and canon is secondary. The latter is really only there to facilitate the former.

-

glitterarygetsit, in a discussion on fan responses to media on facebook

#this is the first time i’ve really articulated this #and i was quite pleased with it #this is the thing: i care so much less about original material than i do about fanworks

(via imorca)

Source: glitterarygetsit

umacasaemtroia:

installationmagazineUn Hiver en Couleur by Florent Tanet

Source: florenttanet.fr

A study on masculinity and aggression from the University of South Florida found that innocuous – yet feminine – tasks could produce profound anxiety in men. As part of the study, a group of men were asked to perform a stereotypically feminine act – braiding hair in this case - while a control group braided rope. Following the act, the men were given the option to either solve a puzzle or punch a heavy bag. Not surprisingly, the men who performed the task that threatened their masculinity were far more likely to punch the bag; again, violence serving as a way to reestablish their masculine identity. A follow-up had both groups punch the bag after braiding either hair or rope; the men who braided the hair punched the bag much harder. A third experiment, all the participants braided hair, but were split into two groups: those who got to punch the bag afterwards and those who didn’t. The men who were prevented from punching the bag started to show acute signs of anxiety and distress from not being able to reconfirm their masculinity.

- Doctor Nerdlove, "When Masculinity Fails Men" (via calloway)

Source: sepiacircus

Initially concerned I had lost half of my Masters notes, I have written notes to myself on all my journal print outs…

Initially concerned I had lost half of my Masters notes, I have written notes to myself on all my journal print outs…

scissorsandthread:

Giant Crepe Paper Peony | Carte Fini
If you’re looking for decorations for a wedding or party with big impact, you can’t go past this amazing giant crepe paper peony! The big petals are layered around a paper mache base. Yes, it would take a while to create this, but if you are making it for a wedding or party, you can keep it afterwards to decorate with!

scissorsandthread:

Giant Crepe Paper Peony | Carte Fini

If you’re looking for decorations for a wedding or party with big impact, you can’t go past this amazing giant crepe paper peony! The big petals are layered around a paper mache base. Yes, it would take a while to create this, but if you are making it for a wedding or party, you can keep it afterwards to decorate with!

whimsebox:

Jennifer Strunge aka Cotton Monster

Telling a young girl she can’t wear what she wants because it’s not appropriate encourages the idea that men’s reactions should dictate society’s norms, and that all women are meta-Eves, tempting and ensnaring men with our sultry-eyed gaze. My parents’ culture is steeped in patriarchy, in the philosophy of the one-step machismo machine, where there is just one kind of man, and two kinds of women: the angel and the whore. These limited ideas of masculinity breed men who want ownership of women.

- Fariha Roison (via girl-violence)

Source: voirsully

Things I did today:

Started making a bag for my bow and an arm guard (which kinda looks like a pad). I started doing archery a couple of weeks ago and as a graduation present, my boyfriend bought me a bow. I didn’t have much money to buy any extra stuff (I only got four arrows, when everyone else was shooting with 12) so I decided I’d make what I could.

I need to get some stiffening tomorrow to finish my bag and some clips to finish the arm guard. I keep catching my arm when I fire, which really stings, so hopefully next week I’ll be less bruised. The bag is made from some old curtains and a zip we had spare. The guard is vinyl, quilt padding and more curtaining, which I then top stitched and added some elastic.

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A collection of cat videos and crochet.
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